Bio

A Bit About Lucas

Lucas Lawson is a young contemporary folk artist who grew up on a farm just north of Santa Cruz, California. In the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, while spending time alone on the farm, Lucas developed the 5 songs that make up his debut EP, Revisited Harbor. This isolation encouraged him to complete the process of recording Revisited Harbor by himself. Once finalized on October 23rd of 2020, Revisited Harbor came to the ears of Lucas’s growing community. 

Without any background in musical engineering, or any money to put towards a studio, Lucas had to get creative with what he had; a macbook and a microphone. Through the process he learned the subtle techniques of recording each respective instrument and then editing and mixing them all together to finalize a song. The imperfect recording and mixing job has given Revisited Harbor a “lo-fi” and honest face. At first Lawson felt uncertain about the sound quality, but has since begun to appreciate the rawness of each individual song.

Lucas’s upbringing on an organic farm exposed him to the balance and harmonies that all living things have to offer. At a young age, Lucas began attending bluegrass barn dances on the farm, where he first learned to play the guitar alongside local group, the County Line Pickers. When those sadly came to a halt in March of 2020, Lucas found himself writing songs more than ever. Seeking structure in all the madness, Lawson visited an oak tree in the woods day after day, and from that came the first song on the EP, “Revisited Harbor”. This song displays Lawson's active self-reflection on his relationship with the natural world, meditation and his own identity.

“Paper Sailboat” and “In the Books,” the second and fourth songs on Revisited Harbor, are both songs of love. The first song communicates his love for another person and the latter for the knowledge books and people have to offer. The lyrics, “Cause I’m a learned man / let’s talk awhile / in the late afternoon can you hear me / it’s a simple song to sing along / and everyone’s asking for you / and everyone’s thinking of what words to use,” share Lucas’s longing for clarity in odd times. 

Through the final song on the record, “They Complain,” Lawson navigates his feeling of wanting to escape a greedy society. Lucas conveys this in the first few lines; waking up and feeling the “cold wind crawl through [his] hair,” an awakening to an evil he is understanding more with age. “I walk and walk / I walk and I walk / right out the door” is a harmony conveying Lucas's desire to turn his back on the greed permeating our capitalist society.

Lucas aims to bring positive and successful change one community at a time through his frequent performances across Santa Cruz County and the San Francisco Bay Area. You will find him playing everywhere from Elementary Schools to concert venues to retirement homes, either with his band or as a solo act. He is currently working on recording his first LP and you can catch a new song or two at any of his shows. 

In August of 2020, the CZU Complex fires, a wildfire that spread 86,509 acres across the Santa Cruz Mountains, reached Lucas’s home and the surrounding landscape. A few days after a lightning storm sparked the flames, Lawson’s family and neighbors faced evacuation orders as the flames climbed over the ridge towards them. The lasting impact of the fire embedded itself into Lawson’s music, as he processed the loss he and his community had faced. "This Dirt," a tribute to all that was lost to the flames, was the first of many songs that emerged from the remains scattered around his home. Lucas begins the song by singing about his home and his expectation that part of it would be taken from him. The lines, “Well this burning / it opened my eye,” coming after, “Light a candle for your loved ones / light a candle watch it burn,” speak of loss from the wildfire and of a community working toward recovery. The second verse of the song dives into Lawson's frustration with our country's lack of effort in protecting our Earth. Lawson pays his respects to the land through transformative lyrics and heartfelt melodies, forging a bond with listeners who have endured struggles akin to his own.